Translator’s Star Wars: 7 lessons from the saga

This post originally appeared on Just Translate It and it is republished with permission.

Searching for a balance between creativity and routine

As an old school Star Wars fan, I can safely say now: “All is well that ends.”

The 42-year legendary saga ended in phews and negative remarks. For me, it’s a reminder that we should not try to monetise all and everything committing our lives to printing money in perpetuity.

Moreover, technology is only as good as people using it. Without a passion and a vision, it’s an empty vessel hardly worth the second glance.

I still believe that the first part of the saga gave rise to better sci-fi movies and new talents. And here is my short tribute to Star Wars I watched “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away”.

Seven Star Wars lessons for becoming a better professional and a better person.

1. Find a good mentor

A good mentor like Grand Master Yoda plays an integral role in shaping your life by stimulating personal and professional growth and challenging you to think differently.

Just like Pade put it, “Mentors have a way of seeing more of our faults that we would like. It’s the only way we grow.”

A mentor does:

  • Take a view of your development.
  • Help you see the destination.
  • Offer encouragement but not “how-tos”.

A mentor does not:

  • Serve as a coach or a counselor.
  • Function as an advocate of yours.
  • Support you on short-term problems.

Each of us develops at our own pace, but mentoring can have many positive and lasting effects both for the mentor and the mentee.

“Do or do not… there is no try.” Yoda
Star Wars: find a mentor

2. Overcome failures to achieve success

As entrepreneurs, translators deal with ups and downs. Gradually, we learn to cope with the feast and famine cycle.

Success is found through trial and error, dedication, and the ability to see setbacks as stepping stones towards better deals.

We all make mistakes, and we sometimes fail. But successful people are good at overcoming failure.

• Do not fear mistakes or failures and treat them like a scientist.
• See challenges as opportunities.
• Take time each day to reflect what’s working and what’s not.
• Take small, repeated actions and focus on small wins.

“Strike me down and I will become more powerful than you can possibly imagine.” – Obi-Wan Kenobi

3. Do not be guided by fear

Fear cripples us from doing what needs to be done. It prevents us from becoming the people we are eager to be.

We are afraid of failing, succeeding, offending people and looking silly. Suddenly, deleting all the old emails in the inbox seems more important than writing to a potential client.

  • Scared of not being good enough? Use that as motivation for consistent CPD activities and credentials.
  • Embrace a system with funny permissions and prizes to get unstuck (like ’28 Days to Clients’).
  • Spend time enjoying yourself to deal with the stress that fear creates.
  • Give yourself credit for all your efforts and not just achievements.

 

“Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering.” – Yoda

4. Dream big

We can do incredible things. But to get both driving force and creative passion to overcome the challenges, you need to know your aim. Accept the fact that there will be people who don’t believe in you. All you can do is work hard to prove them wrong.

Do you think your business is going to be substantially more this year? If your answer is a yes, then you are dreaming big!

• A dream without a plan is just a wish, so plan your next steps.
• Time to work on your plans and steps needs to be a priority on your everyday calendar.
• Your friends and special ones are the people who would support you against all odds.
• As a freelancer, you’re way further along the track than most people. Believe in your abilities!

“Sir, the possibility of successfully navigating an asteroid field is approximately 3,720 to 1.”
“Never tell me the odds.”

 

5. Complete what you started

Goal setting means nothing without goal achievement.

Starting new project is exciting, emotionally arousing, and infused with the natural motivator of novelty. We do not pay much attention to obstacles, downsides or challenges we’ll soon face.

And later (more often than not?), we are inclined to drop off things that we started, without reaching the finish line.

• Know yourself and try to be realistic.
• Ensure your main motivation is based on personally meaningful reasons.
• Research more deeply into your next project before jumping in.
• Make a timeline or write out scheduled steps towards your goal.
• If needed, quit on purpose, without a sense of failure. Avoid the sunk cost fallacy.

“I find your lack of faith disturbing.” – Darth Vader

star wars for translators_dream big

6. Don’t lie to yourself

Listen to your heart, the Force, and your conscience. We usually know what the right thing to do is.

Lie is comfortable as we don’t have to face the hard truth and can keep doing the same thing without changing anything. Lie helps avoid self-responsibility for our actions.

Sometimes, we are inclined to feel miserable. And it’s ok. As long as after that we start doing what’s right for us. You already know what to do. So do it.

• I’m not good enough.
• I don’t have enough time/money for it.
• I am not in the mood.
• It’s too late/early/the wrong day.

 “Already know you, that which you need.” – Yoda

7. There is Force in everyone

Your focus determines your reality. Our thoughts and interests directly affect our future for better or worse. You will find only what you bring in.

Invest your energy into the things and people you are passionate about rather than focusing on the negative moments or empty distractions. Be patient and do not give up — progress happens slowly.

May the force be with you in the new decade coming!

“Well, if droids could think, there’d be none of us here, would there?” — Obi-Wan Kenobi

Author bio

Olesya Zaytseva is an English and German to Russian freelance translator and content marketer with more than 20 years of experience, specializing in tech-focused marketing communications. She loves transforming complex topics into effective and engaging marketing materials for suppliers of printing, packaging and 3D systems and technologies. Feel free to connect with her on LinkedIn. https://www.linkedin.com/in/olesyazaytseva/

What professors don’t teach you about translating professionally

During my undergraduate degree in translation, I felt like I was very prepared for a career in translation. I excelled in my language classes and the translation classes prepared me to thoroughly read a translation brief and identify tone, audience, and purpose so that I could carefully craft a beautiful translation. What more is there to know?

Oh, how unprepared was I… While translation programs are great when it comes to language mediation and translation theory, they seem to be lacking in the areas of client acquisition, marketing, payment practices, and starting a freelance business. (This is my personal experience; however, I have heard similar thoughts from other newly graduated translators.)

As a recent graduate and newbie freelance translator, I felt lost when it came to anything outside the realm of language. So, through lots of research in forums, books, blogs, and translators’ websites, I learned the fundamentals of being a professional translator. I am still learning, but here are some of the concepts that I wish I had known before I graduated:

You will not be translating for 40 hours a week

When I imagined working as a freelancer, I thought of myself translating away for eight hours a day. Little did I know that a lot of my time would actually be spent talking with clients, managing invoices, surfing translation job boards, updating/creating my website, and much more. I really only spend about half my time translating.

You will be an entrepreneur

Freelancing sounds amazing; you don’t have a boss and you work the hours you want. In that same regard though, if you don’t work, you don’t get paid. Learning to manage my time took a while and motivating myself to get up early to work even if I don’t have a project to do that day is hard.

Success doesn’t happen overnight

Getting established as a freelancer takes time. Sometimes you will work for a client that has a tight deadline and you will stay up late and wake up early to finish the project. Yet other times, you will not have any paid work in the pipeline. I learned that putting myself out there often was absolutely necessary if I wanted to find more agencies to work with. Patience is a trait I have been learning to lean on.

You should file as a business and pay taxes

As an entrepreneur, you will have to organize your own business. Whether you decide to create an LLC, a corporation, or a sole proprietorship, you must establish your business in the state that you do business in. Make sure that you do your research to figure out which business filing is best for you. Being a business owner was something I never even thought about during my studies.

You will also have to do your own taxes for the business and pay yearly, quarterly, etc. This can seem very daunting, so hiring a professional accountant to help might not be such a bad idea.

You have to find your own clients

As I said before, you have to keep putting yourself out there, because otherwise no one will know that you even exist. I cannot count the number of agencies I have contacted asking if they need translators in my language pair and then heard nothing back. Researching prospects takes a lot of time but will be worth it.

This also means that having a website and an online presence is essential so that potential clients can find you. Even just having an updated and professional LinkedIn profile is important.

Money matters

I didn’t have one class that talked about what we were all wondering about: money. In the translation industry, it is almost taboo to talk about what to charge because of price fixing. Yet this means that when I started out I didn’t know if I should be charging 2 cookies a word or 20 cookies a word, or if I should charge by the hour. How could I calculate that? Through more research and the help of Corinne McKay’s ‘Deciding what to charge’ worksheet I was able to realistically get an idea of what I can charge and still pay rent.

Accepting payments is also something I never thought about. I’d do the project, the client would send the money, and that’s it. Not so simple. Some agencies only send payments through PayPal or TransferWise, but others will pay you through bank wire transfer. Figure out which option works best for you and your clients. Sometimes wire transfers are too expensive, and PayPal doesn’t accept all currencies. In the end, it takes money to make money, so finding a completely free option might be hard or unsafe.

In reality, the argument for why translation programs don’t teach about the business side of translation is that they are teaching you how to translate, not how to run a business, which I understand as well. So, to the translators who are still pursuing a degree in translation: ask your professors questions about the profession while you still have the time. I sat down with one of my advisors and asked a lot of questions at the end of my last semester, which helped immensely. Read through the great resources for translators out there (The Savvy Newcomer!) and start networking with established translators who may be able to guide you in your first year.

About the author

Olivia Albrecht is a French and Spanish to English translator and copywriter specialized in marketing and tourism. She has a B.S. from Kent State University in translation studies and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in digital marketing. She splits her time between living in Canton, Ohio, US and Cali, Colombia. You can find out more about Olivia on her website at www.oneglobetranslation.com or on Twitter at @OneGlobeTR.

 

Eight tips to become the ideal translator

This post originally appeared on Multilingual and it is republished with permission.

As a senior localization manager, I spend a lot of time finding and hiring translators for my client’s projects. Over the past 15 years, I’ve discovered that the translators who consistently deliver the highest quality adhere to certain helpful and professional business practices. Whether you hire translators or are a professional linguist yourself, whether you are a new translator or one with many years of experience, incorporating these skills will ensure successful and long-lasting partnerships.

1. Be responsive

I routinely send out translation quote requests for potential jobs to an extensive network of professional linguists, but many times, I receive no response. As a project manager, this can be very frustrating. A lack of response doesn’t give me the feedback I need to understand why a particular job wasn’t of interest.

The ideal translator is responsive. They will let me know if they are interested in the project and when they might be free to work on it. If the project isn’t a match for their skill set, or if they aren’t available due to work on another project, they will still respond to let me know. When my contacts take the time to reply, even if the answer is “no thanks,” it shows that they are professional, courteous and that they are interested in a future working relationship.

2. Ask questions

When requesting quotes, I send the name of the client, the industry and the type of content to be translated. The ideal translator will always ask additional, follow-up questions to better understand what the project entails. They will ask about delivery dates, word counts ans so on — any information that will help them do a better job. The best will ask if the client has a style guide, any existing translation memories (TM) or glossaries. By asking questions, they will get the information they need in advance to determine if it is a job that they can complete successfully.

3. Respect deadlines

Translation can be a very deadline-driven business. That’s why translators who respect my deadlines and my client’s deadlines are ideal. As a project manager, I try to give our linguists plenty of time to complete a project. Managing rush jobs and several different delivery dates can be challenging, so knowing when a project will be completed is key to my ability to manage customer expectations. The best translators respect deadlines and will keep me apprised of their estimated delivery date and will always let me know if they need extra time to finish a project.

4. Discuss rates in advance

Most linguists have a per-word rate and different rates depending on the subject matter and type of content. It is important to discuss any applicable rates in advance, before committing to do a project. I always include rates in my initial email. The ideal translator will take note of that information and get any clarification they need on payment terms in advance. The ideal translator should also be willing to negotiate or offer discounts based on higher volumes and the consistent work that is available when working for larger clients. Agreeing to a lower rate can pay off by providing more steady work and lead to becoming a go-to resource for a particular client.

5. Keep in touch

It’s not unusual for project managers and translators to work in different time zones. As a result, it is important to make sure there is a time frame where those hours overlap, in order to communicate about the project in a timely manner. Nothing is more frustrating for a project manager than receiving an Out of Office reply that contains no information on when the recipient will be available. The ideal translator will keep in touch and let me know about any dates they are unavailable, such as local holidays, vacations or when they will be engaged with other projects.

6. Identify potential translation issues

Translation is not an exact science. Sometimes word choices require the translator to make a judgment call on the best translation. We also know that clients might not necessarily agree with those decisions. The best translators will provide a summary of issues or certain word choice decisions, when the project is delivered, before the client sends it on to their reviewers. This type of proactive, conscientious work is always appreciated and helps to ensure that all parties are communicating to ensure the highest quality.

7. Be open to feedback

Feedback is important in translation project management. The ideal translator is professional, open to and accepting of feedback. They do not take negative feedback too personally. There are times when a client might insist on a translation that is non-standard. While it is important to bring this to their attention, the client always has the final say. As the adage goes, “the customer is always right.” Remember that the more feedback you receive, the more you learn. That information can be used to update the style guide of client preferences to ensure satisfaction with the final product.

8. Get certification

When I’m hiring translators, I look for native speakers of the target language(s). It is also important that they are accredited by a globally-recognized translation and interpretation industry organization such as the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI), American Translators Association (ATA), Société Française des Traducteurs (SFT) and so on. The ideal translator will include any certifications they have and display them prominently on their website, profile, and resume. They should also include any subject matter expertise and relevant work history. This makes it easier to have an understanding of their level of qualification for any particular project.

Rise above the competition

Professional translators are facing increasing competition, from each other and from emerging technology that threatens to replace them. Forging long-lasting and financially beneficial relationships with localization project managers and language services providers is key to survival. Becoming the ideal translator is possible with greater communication, attention to detail, professionalism, and being proactive. Translators who adopt these eight business practices will quickly gain a reputation for conscientiousness and quality that will help them stand apart.

Author bio

Romina Castroman has an MBA from the Bremen University of Applied Sciences and a BA in travel and tourism from Brigham Young University. She has 15 years of experience successfully managing projects and cross cultural experience in Europe, Latin America and the US. She is fluent in German, Spanish and English.

Pricing Techniques in the Translation Industry

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn and it is republished with permission.

In the translation industry two pricing techniques seem to dominate: cost plus and competitive pricing. Before looking deeper into these and other pricing techniques, it is important to remember that price is one of the P’s described by Philip Kotler as the fundamental elements of every marketing mix. In a market that has matured over decades, it may surprise that price often is a frustrating factor. Fierce competition, sophisticated buyers and the resulting commoditizing of the translation activity may explain a lot. Whether a language service company is highly profitable or struggling to survive depends not only on the other P’s of the marketing mix, on corporate culture, sales force or even on technology. An inadequate pricing technique may annihilate efforts in the other critical success factors. In other words, the importance of using a pricing technique adapted to a specific business model cannot be overrated. Price is, with the other P’s, a business variable over which companies can to a certain level, exercise control.

Many translation companies opt for mark-up pricing and switch to meet-competitor pricing as soon as the buyer requests such a move or as soon as they are aware that their offer is being compared. This rationale may not be bad in itself, but leads to frustration every time both pricing techniques prove insufficient to conquer new customers or obtain a much necessary or expected project.

Cost plus pricing, also known as markup pricing, basically is a simple method of taking your cost and adding a desired profit margin to the unit cost price to obtain the final price. The formula below helps you to calculate the unit cost price:

Unit cost = (variable cost) + (fixed cost) / unit sales

E.g. a translation agency with fixed costs of 100,000 € that buys its translations from freelance translators at a unit price of 0.075 € /word (variable cost) and projects to sell 1,000,000 words:

(0.075 €) + (100,000 €) / 1,000,000 words = unit cost 0.175 €

Now that the unit cost is known, the markup or cost plus price can be calculated using the formula below, and assuming that the translation agency defined a desired return on sales of 20%:

Cost plus price = (Unit cost) / (1-Markup percentage)

Using our example from above, we would arrive at the following markup price:

(0.175 €) / (1 – 0.20) = 0.218 € cost plus price.

The translation agency in this example, at a volume of 1,000,000 units, has to sell every unit at 0.175 € to break even and at a price of 0.218 € to achieve its sales return targets.

This pricing technique is fast and easy to use but has a major drawback: it does not take into account customer demand. Customers may be willing to pay more … or less for the service than our translation agency is proposing using the cost plus technique. Another possible disqualifier for this technique is the arbitrary definition of the markup percentage. This pricing technique is similar to the target-return pricing where a company-defined return on investment is aimed at.

While many translation agencies have started out with the cost plus pricing technique, they end up applying the competitive pricing technique, also known as going rate pricing.

Competitive or going rate pricing, is a concept where companies define prices using the going rate for products/services as established by its competitors. Often applied in competitive markets with little differentiation between suppliers and consequently plenty of substitutes. Among translation agencies, it is well known that large, sophisticated buying organizations preselect similarly qualified suppliers and then choose the most competitive supplier among these ‘equal service offers’ or ask a preferred supplier to align its prices on those of a competitor. Many translation agencies will try to gather business intelligence on their competitor’s price and will align their price to get projects.

The main disadvantage of this pricing technique is the disconnection between price on the one hand and unit cost and desired return on sales or ROI on the other hand.

There are other pricing techniques that offer interesting alternatives to cost plus and competitive pricing, not in the least thanks to a better balance between the constitutive elements of pricing.

Penetration pricing, is part of a strategy which uses a lower price than many competitors to gain market share as quickly as possible. The logic behind penetration pricing is that of a powerful vision: the company with the largest market share has superior power in the market, and can achieve greater profitability than smaller players… if it can benefit from economies of scale to reduce the unit cost. Companies applying penetration pricing may want to seduce customers by a low price and connect the basic service with more expensive products/services.

A strong argument for this pricing technique is the rapid increase in sales volume. And once companies buy from a supplier offering the lowest price, they have proven to be reluctant to switch to a competitor even if prices begin to rise.

A major risk of this model lies in the lower profitability on the short term. Low prices may also pave the way for a price war with cataclysmic effects on profitability.

Tiered pricing or good-better-best pricing differentiates price according to levels of feature or quality for products/services. An example used by certain translation agencies:

Tiered pricing is used mainly to cater for varying levels of requirements within the same market. This technique enables customers to choose the exact product/service that fits their needs or budget and they know exactly what to expect. If you apply tiered pricing to complex services, the value of the different levels may become blurred – and your customers may need to be educated.

Perceived value to the customer or Value-in-Use pricing is based on the product/service’s value to the customer. A good example is a product or a service that is higher priced but that can arguably reduce overall costs on the long term. The price is disconnected from the cost (unlike cost-plus pricing) and enables companies to raise profitability on products/services that provide real value to buyers. It is crucial to understand the customer benefits and to translate these in financial terms. A well-known example in the translation industry is the use of CAT tools such as translation memory. At a higher word price, a translation agency making use of translation memories will reduce the number of new words to be translated and thus the overall cost for the customer, compared to a translation agency who with no CAT tools retranslates every word every time at the same price.

Variant pricing is a very interesting technique since it takes into account that different markets have different priorities and evaluation criteria. The general idea is to adapt the price setting to different market segments. In the translation industry, it is a well-known fact that medical device manufacturers, financial institutions, manufacturers of tooling machines, and government institutions, to name but a few, have different requirements when it comes to quality, reliability and speed of delivery, budget, project management and communication, etc. Variant pricing helps us to capture the value different market niches place on their specific requirements. Special variants often offer great freedom in pricing with little competition. A requirement to apply variant pricing, is to have conducted thorough market research.

There are many other pricing techniques, not all of which seem of interest for the translation industry. In terms of conclusion to this brief overview on pricing technique alternatives for translation agencies, price can be defined as a value that will buy a finite quantity of a product/service. Price is determined by what a buyer is willing to pay, a seller willing to accept and competition allowing to charge. Pricing also has an impact on organizational goals and it is important to fully grasp these consequences.

(c) Ralf Van den Haute 2014

Sources:

Philip Kotler: Principles of Marketing

Michael E. Porter: Competitive Advantage

Stephan Sorger: Marketing Analytics

Paul W. Farris, Neil T. Bendle, Phillip E. Pfeifer, David J. Reibstein: Marketing Metrics

Your Networking Mistakes are Turning People Off

This post originally appeared on SBO blog and it is republished with permission.

I’ve been networking regularly for about eight years now, gradually increasing the frequency from once a month to at least once a week, sometimes more. As I eased into the rhythm of networking and kept seeing familiar faces (Singapore is really darn small), things got a little boring. And then I started people watching.

It’s actually an interesting exercise to step out of being a participant and into an observer’s point of view. It dawned on me that I was once (and sometimes still am) that douchebag who unintentionally (and now sometimes intentionally, for good reasons, of course) behaved inappropriately.

It’s forgivable if you’re a newbie, but many people remain oblivious to despite going to countless networking events. Let’s count your sins.

Let’s count your sins.

Going without intention

It’s easy for people to tell when you’re networking without a purpose, and they’re likely to think that you’re a time-waster and probably unreliable.

Networking needs to be intentional, even if the intention is as mundane as going there to see who you can possibly connect with. Or maybe you’re looking for more business and want to qualify some prospects. Whatever it is, find a reason to be there. Your actions and chats will become purposeful. People can see that and might even mistake that as confidence.

But of course, this can swing the other way as well, that is approaching the session very intentionally with the goal of selling.

Going with every intention to sell

This very aggressive approach to networking turns people off almost instantly.

A casual survey that I had conducted on a Facebook group revealed that most people hate hard-sellers.

If you’re pulling out your sales deck or portfolio the first time you meet someone, then you’re doing it wrong. Networkers, especially the seasoned ones, can detect desperation. This very aggressive approach to networking turns people off almost instantly.

Remember that networking requires some time investment. It’s all about sowing seeds. Even if the relationships that you’ve nurtured don’t result in a direct sale, they might end up passing referrals to you, simply because you’ve been a sincere friend.

Be a wallflower

… grab an extroverted friend, explain your fear and willingness to face it, and get said friend to help you open up conversations.

Networking means jumping into the pit with everyone. If you’re going to stay in one corner and just wait for people to approach, you’re better off saving your money and staying home. Furthermore, the impression you’d be leaving would be that creep who’s at a corner, and the longer you stay in that corner, the more people will never approach you.

If you’re afraid of crowds but still wish to push boundaries through networking, that’s great! Try approaching someone that’s away from the crowd (there’s always at least one other person) and strike a conversation. Another way is to grab an extroverted friend, explain your fear and willingness to face it, and get said friend to help you open up conversations.

Go talk to someone!

Be passive

Conversation is a two-way street. When you get into a conversation with someone, don’t just give a one-worded reply or wait for the other party to ask more questions. This comes across as insincere and disinterested.

Take a real interest in what people are doing. Reciprocate with genuine questions. Showing that you are curious will encourage people to share more.

Beating around the bush

If you’re going to get someone as a client, they are going to find out who you really are sooner or later. Can they trust you to be honest and professional with their money when you’re not forthcoming?

The most common trades that are present at any networking sessions are financial planners and property agents. The decent ones will not mince their words and just tell you straight up who they are, then tell you what’s different about them. This is great because it saves everyone time. The interested parties can stay, the rest can move on.

Then there are the annoying ones telling you some variation of their job, such as “finance industry professional”, “wealth manager” or “investment strategist”, and only upon probing further that people realise who they really are.

Now think about it. If you’re going to get someone as a client, they are going to find out who you really are sooner or later. Can they trust you to be honest and professional with their money when you’re not forthcoming?

Pushing name cards

People don’t like to be treated as a number, a game or both.

To some people, networking is but a numbers game. The more people you come into contact, the better. These people seem to be always in a rush, shoving their name cards into people’s hands as if they are flyers. The more creative ones give out other forms of marketing collaterals, including gifts, in place of name cards, but that doesn’t make it less offensive.

People don’t like to be treated as a number, a game or both. They want to be treated as a valued individual. Even if you’re in a rush, linger for a while, ask a few questions and at least try to understand the other party at a superficial level. When you really need to go, apologise and offer to arrange a separate time to catch up.

If you’re still not convinced and insist on doing this, you’re better off standing at the MRT station giving out flyers. You’d capture a lot more people.

Pushing name cards pushes people away.

Dominating the conversation

While it’s true that networking is all about talking, it’s not all about you. People didn’t pony up and gather at a place at their free time to hear you ramble on and on about yourself. Don’t hog the individual. As interesting as that person may be, he or she would like to know more people too.

Be aware of the conversation. It’s obvious that you’re just talking to yourself when nobody’s asking you questions. But if you find someone who really does ask a lot about you, find an opportune time to turn the tables around and say, “I’ve been talking so much about myself, but I hardly know you!”, then follow up with a question.

Another good rule of thumb is to move on after some time. “Some time” is really subjective because it depends on how many people are there and how much time you have. In doubt, keep to 5-10 minutes and move on.

Asking to be added to someone’s personal social media

Unless you’re talking about LinkedIn or if you’re sure the other party feels as if you’re a long lost twin, do not ask to be added on Facebook, Instagram or the likes. It may come across as an invasion of privacy, particularly when you’ve just met. Think of how uncomfortable you’d be when a stranger comes so close to you that you can feel their breath. Yup, it’s that creepy.

Be a friend first before asking to be added to their personal social network. If you can’t wait, LinkedIn is the closest you should get.

Using your phone or talking to someone while someone else is talking

That’s simply rude. You’re sending the message that you’re either not interested or not paying attention.

If you’re keen on the conversation but really have to attend to your phone or someone else, apologise and tell that person that you’ll get back later once you’re done.

If you’re not keen, find an excuse and move along.

Pro tip: Unless you have an image to keep, using your phone is actually a good strategy to turn off those that you don’t want to talk to. I’ll share more in a future article.

Stop checking your mobile phone when someone’s talking to you!

Turn a coffee session into a sales meeting

If you asked for a coffee session, keep it as is. Don’t start whipping out your slide deck and present your product.

A coffee session with someone you’re keen to work with is a good idea as a follow-up to a networking session. But be very clear of what you asked for. If you asked for a coffee session, keep it as is. Don’t start whipping out your slide deck and present your product.

That session is good for you to understand the other party at a deeper level. Find out what they do and the challenges they face. With all that information, you’d be positioning yourself better to offer a solution and, eventually, close the deal. Even if you don’t, you’ve probably forged a stronger relationship with a potential source of referrals.

Even till today, I’m guilty of some of these mistakes (an introvert loves to be a wallflower). Just being a little more mindful helps you to become a better networker, leave good impressions and form stronger relationships.

Have you observed any other annoying behaviour? Comment below.

Author bio

Vinleon Ang is the chief editor of Singapore Business Owners, a small business magazine that talks about businesses in Singapore. He is passionate about content marketing and building magazine titles. He is also available for consulting and partnerships. Feel free to connect with him on LinkedIn.