The Savvy Newcomer Resources page

It was a genius who said, “Never memorize something you can look up.” But as any good translator or interpreter knows, you have to know where to look it up as well! In this case, you’re in luck: The Savvy Newcomer has done the work for you with our Resources page. You can find the list, which contains links to what we consider to be some of the most useful resources on the web, in the tab titled “Resources” at the top of our blog. As the blog has grown, we have found that it is hard to get a glimpse of the full gamut of information it contains, so we wanted to have this way to share some of the tips and tricks we have found that make our lives a whole lot easier! Here is a glance at the content on the Resources page:

Journals, Newsletters, and Style Guides

Who doesn’t love a good style guide? We have compiled a list of just a few resources that may help as you make style decisions in your translations—some in English, some in Spanish. Know of a good style guide for another language? Let us know—we would love to include it!

Technology

The three resources listed under the Technology section are great not only for translators but for any computer user—they can even help you proofread general documents in Word.

Glossaries, Terminology, and Research

The resources in this section contain a wealth of information on terms and language use. They are especially helpful for subject-specific work and term research.

Education and Courses

Translators and interpreters alike can agree it is important to receive training. These resources will give you an idea of where to get started, whether you are looking into a certificate or a degree, interpreting or translation, local or distance learning.

Resources developed by ATA’s Certification Committee

The links in this section are a great starting point if you are considering taking the ATA Certification Exam; they will help you learn more about how the exam is developed, scored, and managed. The style guide and resource list are helpful not only for those preparing for the exam, but also for use in everyday translation work.

Advocacy Resources

The resource in this category is a link to ATA’s response to the Department of Homeland Security’s request for comments on its Language Access Plans. It is an interesting read as we look for ways to explain our credentials and advocate for our profession.

ATA Division Sites

This category contains links to all of ATA’s division websites. Take a look and see if any strike your fancy! ATA members can join an unlimited number of divisions for free and access division websites, forums, and newsletters on each particular subject matter or language.

As you may know, Savvy is always looking for more great content, and our Resources page is no exception—if you’d like to suggest a resource for us to include, send us an email at atasavvynewcomer@atanet.org.

Header image: Pixabay

Minutes from The Savvy Newcomer Logbook

June 15, 2015.

pawel kadyszAfter a few months of letting The Savvy Newcomer ship fly the flags of other bloggers, the Captain and Crew had a team meeting to rediscover the world of original content.

It had been a few months since they had connected as a team, and thanks to the valiant efforts of Mate Christaki, who had valiantly kept The Savvy Newcomer reblog series alive, the ship was still sailing on current content.

Over the spring of 2015, The Savvy Newcomer team members had various things going on in their lives that caused them to focus their energy elsewhere. Also, as good crew members of other translator association boats, they were busy helping with other initiatives that needed attention.

  • Jamie Hartz graduated from Kent State University and moved to Pennsylvania. She now has a Master of Arts in Spanish Translation and is launching her freelance career. The rest of the team is very proud of her!
  • Daniela Guanipa directed the redesign, revamping, and relaunch of the new website of the Association of Translators and Interpreters of Florida (ATIF) in preparation for the ATA conference in Miami this November.
  • Helen Eby assisted the Oregon Society of Translators and Interpreters (OSTI) as it worked on passing the new Healthcare Interpreting law, and provided assistance to the ATA Interpreters Division.
  • Dan McCartney was busy transitioning into a full-time job managing client relations for a translation company in Chicago!
  • David Friedman was busy with the peak season for annual report translations, new adventures with direct clients, and developing his local team of translators in Sweden.
  • Kimberley Hunt was trying to get on board while starting her internship in France. She is getting her Masters in Translation and Interpreting at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. We strive to always have a student on board, and Jamie graduated.
  • Catherine Christaki never abandoned ship and kept The Savvy Newcomer blog alive with reblogs. The rest of the team is grateful to her for keeping the ship on course!

The team met, looked at the chart and plotted a new course. They realized that every crew member had gained valuable experiences over the spring while helping other association ships and growing their businesses. Part of the seaman’s code of honor is to help each other at sea, and so they are now planning to share the lessons learned over these months with our readers.

Keep your eyes peeled for these upcoming posts from each of our members:

  • Jamie: Transition from student to professional
  • Daniela: Keeping a steady pace while balancing work, volunteering, and family life
  • Helen: The value of a 40 hour introductory training program for interpreting – and why I organized a Trainer of Trainers in Oregon!
  • David: The inner workings of a team of entrepreneurial translators
  • Catherine: The lessons and hardships of relocating across the ocean
  • Dan: From freelance famine to full-time feast
  • Kimberley Hunt: The story of a U.S. intern in France

We learned how valuable teamwork is, since while some are busily taking care of urgent issues, others continue to follow the charted course. Mutual trust and close contact are essential, and so we decided to schedule regular meetings in advance to keep us connected, and help us stay motivated to write and share interesting content. We serve the other ATA ships, and other ATA bloggers support us as well. We would like to thank everyone for their support! Together, we give newcomers the inspiration, knowledge and tools to get the most out of their prospective translation and interpreting careers.

Here are some exciting articles we have in the pipeline:

  • A newbie from Chicago tells us how the 2014 conference went.
  • Jonathan Hine: Revision and its kin.
  • Christiane Nord: A series of articles on taking messages across the linguaculture barrier.
  • Mercedes Guhl: An article on the line between too freely translated and too literally translated.
  • Others are in progress, and more details will follow as soon as they are confirmed.

Ahoy, mates!

The Savvy Newcomer Ship has reset its compass. Please contact the team if you would like to participate and lend a helping hand. Many hands make light work!

The story behind the blog

This blog was born on a brainstormy day, drawing on suggestions from the ATA Newcomers listserv and the recently created Student Involvement Committee. But to understand the true nature of The Savvy Newcomer, we need to take a look at the role played by both groups and the people who have made this blog possible.

When Helen Eby became Assistant Administrator for the ATA Spanish Division, the Division was set on having a Student Involvement Committee. Helen’s passion for helping people succeed is what drove her to approach campus administrators, who welcomed the idea with open arms.

“I am an experimenter, so this seemed to fit my sense of adventure.” – Helen Eby

However, it soon became apparent that such a Committee should benefit students of all languages, not only in the English/Spanish combination, so although born bilingual, this child of the Spanish Division quickly grew into a mature, independent polyglot.

During the 2012 ATA Conference in San Diego, Jamie approached Helen and through a brief conversation Helen quickly realized Jamie was the perfect candidate to chair the new Student Involvement Committee. And so, with all the contagious enthusiasm that Helen is capable of instilling, Jamie became the very first student to ever chair a committee within the ATA, and has done a marvelous job.

“Being part of this effort gives me the chance to think back and ask myself, ‘What would have helped me to get acclimated to this when I was getting started, and how can I help other newbies who are in the same boat as I was?’” – Jamie Hartz

In addition, the Newcomers listserv is a forum for, well, newcomers, but not necessarily restricted to students only. It is open to anyone interested in switching careers and becoming a professional translator. Think about it as an informal coaching forum.

It seemed a natural fit to combine topics from the listserv with the spirit of the Student Involvement Committee, but we still needed somebody to bring it all together and turn it into an actual blog.

That is when Daniela came into the picture as a new volunteer on the Spanish Division Leadership Council. She was quickly moved to the forefront of the operation, joining Helen and Jamie, and assumed responsibility for the technical aspects of setting up and managing the blog, as well as organizing a rough outline of posts.

“For the longest time I had wanted to contribute to the ATA in a meaningful way, and I believe this has been the perfect opportunity for me, combining my passion for translation, writing, and tech stuff.” – Daniela Guanipa

This blog draws on ideas gathered from the Newcomers listserv, from the experience of its contributors and moderators, and from the involvement of our readers.

We believe you will find our blog fresh, practical, and inviting. We hope you enjoy reading it as much as we enjoy writing the posts, finding interesting content for you, and responding to your feedback.

What do you hope to read about on The Savvy Newcomer? Ideas welcome!