Revision: a nlboe and etessanitl srcviee

ATA Conference session T-10, Saturday 10:00-11:00, Garden B

Revision a nlboe and etessanitl srcvieeIf you can read the intended title of this presentation, then you can understand that it is impossible to catch all our own mistakes. As translators, we become as close to the material as the author (some say closer). Our eyes begin to gloss over typos and errors as our brain becomes accustomed to them. This is why we catch new errors all the time, even after publication.

Every professional translation deserves to be checked by a second translator before delivery. This is called revision. Only an experienced translator can do this job. Teachers or Certification exam graders may seem suited to the work, but professional revision is not the same as grading papers or exams. Many “newbies” to the ATA Conference are in fact experienced translators, so they should be able to accept revision assignments and perform this critical service. Also, the principles of revision apply to our self-revision. Anything that can increase our effectiveness as revisers can increase the quality of our work and also the confidence that our clients have in us.

The presentation will define revision and contrast it with activities that look like it but are not (e.g. editing, copyediting, proofreading, grading, and evaluating). It will also include pointers on how to approach the revision task and how to price it.

Whether you have ever revised anyone else’s work or not, come to learn about this crucial activity and add it to the palette of services that you can offer your clients. Enjoy the bad puns and cartoons, too.

Header image credit: kaboompics

Author bio

Jonathan HineJonathan Hine, CT (I>E) translated his first book, a medical text, in 1962. Besides translating and revising, he conducts workshops throughout the U.S. He also writes self-help books and articles for freelancers, and a blog about working while traveling. A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy (B.Sc.), the University of Oklahoma (MPA) and the University of Virginia (Ph.D.), he belongs to several ATA divisions, the National Capital Area Chapter of ATA and the American Translation and Interpreting Studies Association (ATISA).

He also volunteers as an ATA mentor and a Certification Exam grader. Contact: mailto:hine@scriptorservices.com

Ensuring Payment – Before, During and After the Project

Session IC-3 at the 2016 ATA Conference – Thursday, 3:30-4:30pm

Ensuring Payment – Before, During and After the ProjectATA57 will mark the 6th time I have given this presentation at an ATA annual conference, and the ninth time overall. The presentation is based on the knowledge and experience I have gained as a freelance translator working with agencies for more than twenty years and from monitoring payment issues on Payment Practices for more than fifteen years.

Late and nonpayment is a fact of life in business. It occurs in all industries and professions in every country in the world. Due to the global marketplace in our profession, in which it is not uncommon for freelance translators and agency clients to be located in different states or even different countries, collecting on past due invoices can be particularly problematic, if not a practical impossibility.

Freelance translators must therefore conduct a thorough due diligence before accepting projects from new agency clients. They must carefully vet new clients by confirming their identity and evaluating their creditworthiness. Freelance translators must also ensure that they themselves do not give an agency client any reason whatsoever to reduce their payment or refuse to pay at all.

This presentation will provide you with strategies and information sources as well as specific actions you should take before accepting a project so that you can not only properly vet your potential client, but also ensure that each party to the transaction knows exactly what is required of the other party.

We will discuss actions that should be taken during the project should unforeseen difficulties arise, as well as actions you should take when delivering your translation. We will discuss customary payment terms and invoicing procedures, as well as dunning procedures, i.e., what to do when payment is late.

Header image credit: Pixabay

Author bio
Ted R. WozniakTed Wozniak is the treasurer of ATA. He has bachelor’s degrees in Accounting and German and is a graduate of the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, CA. Before becoming a freelance translator, he was an accountant, stockbroker, liaison officer, and interrogation instructor at the U.S. Army Intelligence School. After pursuing graduate studies in Germanics, he became a German>English translator specializing in finance, accounting, and taxation. He was an adjunct instructor for New York University teaching German to English financial translation and was a mentor for the University of Chicago Graham School’s German>English Financial Translation Program. He is also the president of Payment Practices, a database of translation company payment behavior, as well as the moderator of Finanztrans, a mailing list for German financial translators.

German Immersion Strategies for Expatriates and Other Deutsch-Fans

By Marion Rhodes

german-immersion-strategiesBeing aware of linguistic trends is crucial for translators. To avoid language atrophy, those of us who have traded our native home country for a foreign country home need to find ways to continually immerse ourselves in our mother tongue.

A German expatriate myself, I have to make a conscious effort to keep up with the evolution of my native language, which is being shaped by immigration and pop culture. Luckily, the Internet and modern technology offer plenty of opportunities for reading, watching and listening to German – and many other languages, for that matter – on a daily basis.

With the help of my colleagues in the ATA’s German Language Division, I have collected an exhaustive list of resources to share with my fellow expatriates at this year’s ATA Conference in San Francisco. My presentation, German Immersion Strategies for Expatriates and Other Deutsch-Fans, will explore some of the main influences on the German language and offer helpful ideas on how to stay immersed in the German language when you’re living outside a German-speaking country.

Considering the fact that a fifth of the German population has a migration background, meaning they are either immigrants themselves or descendants of immigrants, it is not surprising that everyday speech is changing. In a 2010 study, 84% of Germans said they had noticed significant changes in the German language, such as new words or a tendency to use simplified grammar. Without regular exposure to newspapers and magazines, TV shows, advertisements, radio banter, and of course conversations with other native speakers, expatriates are no longer exposed to such developments.

This is particularly problematic for marketing and PR translators or those of us who specialize in transcreation. Good marketing and advertising copy is designed to evoke emotions, and recreating that effect for a different country requires familiarity with idiomatic expressions and tone of voice used by various target groups in the local market. Marketers and copywriters need to connect with their audiences at eye level, talk the way they talk and use the words they use. So if you’re translating an ad campaign targeting Generation Z consumers, you’d better be up to date on your youth lingo. Likewise, if you are translating a B2B website, you should know which Anglicisms and neologisms improve your copy – and when you’re overdoing it.

My presentation will demonstrate the fluidity of modern German with examples that highlight the importance of staying in touch with its linguistic development. Drawing on my own experience and the input from my colleagues, I will share immersion strategies to keep your native language alive and fresh even if it is no longer your primary language. Whether you are looking for ways to watch German TV abroad, need help connecting with other German speakers in your area or are interested in the best podcasts to keep up your German skills, you are sure to walk away with some useful tips that can help improve the native style of your translations.

Header image credit: Pexels

Author bio

marion-rhodesMarion Rhodes is an English-German translator and copywriter specializing in PR & marketing communications and transcreation. A native of Germany, she has lived in the United States for more than 15 years and currently resides in San Diego County, California. She has a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Nebraska and is finishing her master’s degree in integrated marketing communications at West Virginia University this fall. In April, she was elected president of the Colorado Translators Association, for which she previously served as social media coordinator.