10 New Year’s Resolutions in the Field of Privacy for Freelance Translators

This post was originally published on LinkedIn. It is reposted with permission from the author.

Do you collect personal data from your clients and prospects living in the European Economic Area (EEA)? If so, give a fresh start to your privacy practices.

1.      Clean up your clients and prospects’ personal data

Do you store personal data from your clients and prospects living in the European Economic Area (EEA)? If no legal or contractual obligations require you to keep it, destroy it immediately. Check the legal data retention period that is applicable to you with your local attorney. If you want to keep your translation memories for a long time, anonymize them or clean them up.

2.      Have a privacy policy

Here are two options:

  • Contact your local privacy attorney as they surely have a privacy policy template. Audit your activity first and be ready to explain what you do, what personal data you collect, and why. Don’t forget that we have now entered the new GDPR era: you need a legal basis to process personal data.
  • Craft your own privacy policy. Check your relevant Data Protection Authority’s website. Some of them have templates. Be sure to check the local legal requirements that apply to you on top of the GDPR. Have a privacy lawyer review your policy.

 3.      Post your privacy practices

Post your privacy practices in a conspicuous place on your website (e.g. the footer). Be transparent. At data collection time, advise the user what the data will be used for on your contact form. Don’t have a website? If you have a trade association, ask them if they can add a section to your profile to post it online. Your clients and prospects will be able to see that you care about their privacy.

4.      Make sure the partners you work with adopt appropriate safeguards to protect personal data

Review your translation service agreements: do they incorporate the required data processing addenda?

5.      Check the data you collect through the cookies you place via your website

Make sure you collect anonymized data (e.g. IP addresses). Remember, you need to collect your website users’ approval before placing any non-functional cookies on their devices.

6.      Attend a cybersecurity forum

Contact your local small business administration or equivalent organization if you have one. They may be organizing cybersecurity trainings where you’ll learn the best industry practices to protect your hardware, software, and data. You can also check whether a free Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on cybersecurity is offered online.

7.      Reduce your chances of a data breach

You don’t need to keep all your data on your computer. Adopt “lean” practices. Think about it this way: the less data on your device, the less data a hacker can get their hands on. Done with a translation project? Encrypt your data, transfer it to an offline device, or choose a reliable cloud service. Under the GDPR, data breaches must be notified within 72 hours.

8.      Follow your client’s instructions exactly when you translate a file containing personal data

Use the best security measures to translate files containing personal data. Don’t use machine translation tools unless your client has explicitly instructed you to do so. Under the GDPR, you must not transfer personal data without your client’s explicit approval.

If your client does not understand the source language and you notice the source file contains EEA individuals’ personal data, let them know about it to ensure personal data is adequately protected all the time.

9.      Stay tuned to the privacy law evolution

Subscribe to your data protection authority’s or your law firm’s newsletter. Under the GDPR (Art. 59), each data protection authority must publish an annual report on its activities. This wealth of information will allow you to better understand how consumers, even your own clients, use the GDPR framework. It will remind you why you need to obtain your client’s valid consent before launching direct advertising campaigns.

Keep an eye on the proposal for the future EU ePrivacy Regulation.

10.   Treat your client’s subject access requests with care

Don’t overlook your replies to the subject access requests you may receive. Establish a routine method to check the identity of the data subjects initiating the requests. Reply within one month. In most cases, you must provide the information free of charge.

Need more resources? Check out my GDPR Useful Resources.

Author bio

Monique Longton has been translating legal and financial documents from English, Swedish, and Danish into French for over 12 years. Her expertise with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and related privacy and data security matters was honed by translating numerous legal analyses, security policies, privacy notices, and data processing agreements.

As a Certified Information Privacy Professional for Europe and member of the International Association for Privacy Professionals, she stays current on industry trends, attends cybersecurity events, and networks with privacy professionals. She is especially familiar with the unique GDPR challenges faced by U.S.-based freelance linguists working for privacy-minded European clients.

What freelancers can learn from entrepreneurs

This post was originally published on the Freelancers Union blog. It is reposted with permission from the author.

Get paid for doing what I love, doing it wherever I want, whenever I want, and however I want. No more bosses demanding unconvincing protocols or mandatory smiles (I’ll never forget those six years at a burger joint where “smiles were a part of my uniform”), and no more needing to be at a specific place at a specific time.

That was the dream I was sold. But then I found myself staring blankly at the computer. Not quite looking at it — my eyes crossed just enough to see the particles of dust floating in front of it.

I had just delivered a month-long project to a regular client. It was a grueling month. The deadline bordered unreasonable and in order to deliver on time I had to work late into the nights. It was August and, despite the respite I found with the air-conditioned interior, I still longed to go out there.

The project finished. Boom. Delivered. It was done. Was that the best work I’ve done? I don’t think so. Did it fill me with joy and a sense of fulfilment? Definitely not. Had I become a freelancer, moved to Europe, and found my “freedom” just to be locked inside an office all summer? Was this supposed to be my calling? Why did I feel so empty?

By that point, the work grind I had invested so much of myself in resulted in a burn out. That night, after I hit the little blue send button with all the deliverables packed cozily in a zipped package, I couldn’t even read an email.

I had to leave. From the next month, anybody trying to get a hold of me would only get an automatic away message. I stuffed a backpack and got the first ticket I could find to a Greek island. I didn’t care which. I had no paid vacation, and I needed to work. But I couldn’t.

For the first time since I’d begun freelancing, I wasn’t excited to get back to work. I didn’t understand why this hustle and grind had left me feeling so depleted. That month of August, I made the most money I have ever made in my career as a freelance translator and writer. But was that sustainable?

All I understood was that there was something that wasn’t clicking about my approach to work. The secret, it turns out, was creating systems.

A new approach

When I reluctantly came back to work, having spent all my money, I spent weeks thinking about how I could rearrange my professional life. I binge-listened to podcasts, blogs, and began my habit of reading three books a month. I would find the solution.

And the message began to manifest itself to me: I had to learn to work like entrepreneurs and corporations do. Focus management, not time management, was the answer. And I had to prioritize what was most important. I wanted to spend more time in my genius zone and less time in everything else. I would find ways to automate, diversify, and scale my income.

I’ve always had an entrepreneurial approach to freelancing: I understood it was a business, that I needed to consider marketing, organization, and customer service in my approach. I created content to help people around me. I needed to be reachable, pleasant to work with, and deliver fantastic work on time.

But there had to be a better way than just increasing rates or getting more gigs. Freelancing is a fantastic way to find freedom, follow your life’s calling, and make great money. Which is a viable and perfect business model for many. But there was something limiting me, and I knew that spending all my time on billable hours was not the way to grow.

Bigger and scalable

As Seth Godin put it: “Your labor is finite. It doesn’t scale. If it’s a job only you can do, you’re not building a system, you’re just hiring yourself (and probably not paying enough either).”

So I decided to shift into an entrepreneur mindset. You don’t need to become an entrepreneur, but take an entrepreneurial approach. You don’t need to give up freelancing in lieu of being an entrepreneur, per se.

Entrepreneurs work to take themselves out of the equation; they use ideas to build well-oiled systems to run their businesses. Freelancers do something they’re good at in exchange for money. There are similarities between the approaches. For example, both entrepreneurs and freelancers can have a personal brand, and neither of them have a boss.

I love to write and translate and would like to continue doing it. But we can take examples from entrepreneurs and apply it to our freelance businesses. The most useful thing freelancers can take from entrepreneurs is to create systems for their businesses.

Create a system for your work and stick to it

Entrepreneurs are masters at building systems. That’s the premise of their whole business plan. Build a system, implement it, and turn it into a cash machine. Freelancers can create systems to increase productivity and performance:

  • Email templates
  • A customer management system
  • An onboarding sequence (pre-call questionnaire, a brief created to make the most of your client call, and follow-up)
  • A feedback system (creating a client questionnaire asking for feedback on specific stages of your service – outreach, onboarding, customer service, deliverables, and the actual work itself)
  • An automated social media plan
  • Outsource what you do not want to do yourself: accounting, bookkeeping, social media, etc.
  • A specific quality assurance system that you follow for every job
  • Terms and conditions designed to save back-and-forth and hassle
  • Defined objectives and steps to reach them
  • A set schedule that includes non-billable work (marketing, growth and development) PLANNED in. Your work as a freelancer is not only your client work. Plan for it. Plan time to plan. Build your business continuously. There will never be a moment when you have “free time”.

The list goes on.

Creating these systems builds your personal brand as a professional, increases leads, sales, and makes happier customers. You’ll become better at attracting the right clients and repelling the ones that are not aligned with you. Ultimately you’ll better respond to their needs because you’ll have a system for understanding what they are.

Now, tell me, do you have systems for your business?

Image source: Pixabay

Maeva Cifuentes is a digital nomad, blogger, content strategist, writer and translator. She helps entrepreneurs grow their brands and find freedom.

El encargo de traducción: ¿qué preguntar antes de aceptar?

This post was originally published on the En la luna de Babel blog. It is reposted with permission from the author.

Últimamente he trabajado con varios clientes nuevos (empresas, agencias y particulares) y buscando en la red cómo enfocaban este asunto otros compañeros, di con un listado de Tomedes, que reproduzco aquí con su permiso y amplio con algunos apuntes de mi cosecha:

PREGUNTAS PARA EL CLIENTE

Empecemos por lo básico: las preguntas que debes hacer al cliente que necesita la traducción.

  1. ¿Cuántas palabras tiene el documento?
  2. ¿Cuál es el plazo?
  3. ¿Cuál es el tema? ¿Es muy especializado o técnico?
  4. ¿Es documento escrito o es un archivo de audio? En este último caso, ¿se nos pide también transcripción?
  5. ¿En qué formato está? ¿Es un Word, un PDF, un fax escaneado (sí, aún existen)?

Esta información es impepinable, si queremos verlo así. Es importante saber qué vamos a traducir y por cuánto. Y en cuanto a las palabras, cuando nos envíen el documento para traducir (o para verlo solo si estamos en proceso de elaboración de presupuesto), cerciorémonos de que la cantidad de palabras es correcta. A todos se nos puede pasar, incluso al gestor de proyectos o al cliente directo, así que es importante comprobar que todo esté bien desde un principio.

Tampoco está de más preguntar:

6. En el caso de una traducción de marketing o una web: ¿requieren localización o solamente traducción? Si es un texto publicitario, ¿necesitan transcreación?

7. ¿El proyecto va a necesitar una edición o maquetación posterior (desktop publishing  o dtp)?

Cuanto más sepamos del encargo desde un principio, mejor informados estaremos del trabajo que nos espera y lo que vamos a tardar en hacerlo. El tiempo es dinero. No es lo mismo un texto plano sin más, que tener que controlar aspectos de diseño que van a requerir más tiempo una vez terminada la traducción.

question-mark

ASPECTOS ECONÓMICOS

Hay que ser muy claros con los elementos económicos del proyecto también antes de empezar. Se debe acordar un honorario o tarifa, además del método de pago y el plazo de cobro. En cuanto al honorario, que quede claro si es por texto origen o texto meta. También podemos plantearnos lo siguiente:

  1. ¿Es un trabajo urgente?
  2. ¿Es una traducción jurada o va a requerir un certificado de algún tipo?

En ambos casos hay que cobrar algo más, sobre todo por las horas extras en el caso de los encargos urgentes. Por eso la comunicación es esencial y todo debe quedar atado antes de ponerse a traducir. Hay que explicarle al cliente si va a haber cargos extra para que este dé el visto bueno antes de empezar.

calculation

NUESTRO PAN, NUESTRO HORARIO

Como no somos maquinitas sino personas, no está de más plantearse lo siguiente:

  1. ¿La tarifa es aceptable para nosotros? Tal vez este cliente “imponga” un precio. De ser así, preguntémonos si de verdad es justo para nosotros. Recalco para nosotros, porque aunque hay que ser conscientes de los precios de mercado para no perjudicar al sector y a nosotros mismos, cada uno tiene sus circunstancias. Hay quien considera que 0,05 para un folleto general es poco y no baja nunca de 0,07, pero para otro puede ser una tarifa más que aceptable por el trabajo que va a conllevar.
  2. ¿Podemos cumplir el plazo y aun así tener tiempo para comer, dormir y tener vida social?
  3. ¿Con este encargo podemos conseguir más trabajo de este cliente?

Esto último puede ser importante. Tal vez por necesidades del cliente, este proyecto nos haga trabajar hasta tarde un par o tres de días, pero si a la larga puede darnos más trabajo, encargos regulares, tal vez el sacrificio valga la pena. O no. Quizá pensemos que ceder a ciertos plazos poco realistas puede sentar un precedente peligroso y decidamos explicárselo al cliente (de lo que hablamos cuando hablamos de “educar”) o bien no aceptar el trabajo. Una vez más, debemos ser claros con nosotros mismos para ver si podemos encajar este encargo en nuestra planificación y poder equilibrarlo con lo demás, ya sean otros proyectos o, sobre todo, con nuestra vida.

puj-e-1601x-3-video_still12042015-318x210

OTRAS CONSIDERACIONES

Hay más cosas que debemos tener en cuenta, dependiendo de la carga de trabajo… y el estado de nuestras cuentas.

¿Me interesa el tema de la traducción o me voy a aburrir como una ostra? Aunque nos aburra, tal vez nos interese aceptar el encargo porque vamos descargados de trabajo, porque nos interesa mantener al cliente o porque lo necesitamos económicamente. Pero en ese caso, seamos conscientes de lo que nos va a suponer.

Cuando se puede escoger –y ahora hablo a título personal–, prefiero una novela a unos presupuestos anuales o un manual técnico. Si por lo que sea, necesito el encargo, me armo de valor y me lo tomo con filosofía. Por desgracia no siempre podemos escoger, pero sí es un factor que debemos plantearnos. ¿Acaso no trabajamos más motivados cuando algo nos gusta?

También hay que pensar en quién es el cliente y si está recomendado. Puede que esto no tenga tanto peso a la hora de aceptar el encargo, pero contribuye al nivel de confianza y seguridad al trabajar.

En este tema que nos ocupa hoy, vale la pena también prestar especial atención a estos diez consejos de Tess Whitty:

  1. No aceptes un proyecto que sepas que no vas a poder hacer. No tengas miedo a rechazar algo que sabes objetivamente que no puedes cumplir o que no puedes hacer sin que se resienta la calidad. Si aún quieres aceptarlo, puedes buscar a algún compañero que te lo revise o puedes encontrarle un sustituto al cliente y facilitarle así la gestión. Seguro que te lo agradecerá.
  2. No aceptes trabajos con plazos imposibles. No lo dudes y negocia. A veces con un recargo por urgencia se descubre que la traducción no era tan urgente. Como con todo, la comunicación es clave.
  3. No dudes en preguntar. Seamos sinceros, no lo sabemos todo. Pregunta al cliente cualquier cosa que no tengas clara o pídele textos paralelos o antiguas traducciones (si el cliente es una agencia, por ejemplo). Preguntar no es demostrar ignorancia sino profesionalidad. No dejes las dudas para el final o para el mismo correo de entrega, cuando no haya margen para solventarlas.
  4. No aceptes un trabajo sin haber visto el texto antes. Puede que no siempre sea posible (me ha pasado con alguna novela), pero lo mejor es ver el documento antes de aceptar para calcular mejor el tiempo, para comprobar que es de una temática que controlamos y, en definitiva, para ver si es factible.
  5. No aceptes un trabajo sin saber quién es el cliente. En el caso de clientes directos es más difícil (que no imposible), pero si es una agencia que no conoces, lo mejor es buscar su página web o mirar en algunos foros (BlueBoard de ProZ, algunos grupos de facebook). Y aunque el correo sirve como confirmación de un trabajo de traducción, es aconsejable tener siempre una orden de compra o PO (purchase order) en la que consten las tres P básicas del proyecto: palabras, precio y plazo.
  6. No empieces a trabajar hasta que no hayas acordado un precio. A nadie le gustan las sorpresas en la factura, así que sé muy claro con lo que vas a cobrar, haya extras o no. Y trata de barrer para casa, claro. Para este proyecto tan pequeño, ¿no es mejor aplicar una tarifa mínima? Para esta revisión, ¿por qué no cobras por hora?
  7. Piensa en lo que escribes antes de enviarlo al ciberespacio. Hay muchos foros y páginas ahora en las que un traductor puede desahogarse, pero seamos sensatos. Un mensaje airado en las redes sociales puede terminar en manos del cliente. Piensa bien antes de escribir, deja pasar un rato y verás que, en frío, no es todo tan grave como parecía. Y lo mismo al hablar directamente con los clientes: respiremos y luego escribamos… más tranquilos. Con amabilidad se va a todos lados. En serio.
  8. Véndete bien. No te centres en lo que no sabes o en la poca experiencia que tienes. Céntrate en tus puntos fuertes, en lo que has traducido ya, en lo bueno que puedes aportar. Y eso también se aplica a la tarifa. Cobra lo justo. Un precio bajo también significa menor rentabilidad para ti.
  9. Guarda toda la información y correspondencia. Es importante guardar los correos, contratos y otros documentos de cada cliente, sobre todo para tenerlos de referencia. Para esto va muy bien un disco duro externo que pueda almacenar esa información que no usamos en el día a día.
  10. Lee todas las cláusulas antes de firmar un contrato. Básico para no llevarnos sorpresas luego. A veces son contratos estándar cuyas disposiciones no se aplican, pero, una vez más, en caso de duda, consúltalo con el cliente.

Hasta aquí los consejillos de hoy. ¿Hay algo que consideréis esencial al aceptar un encargo? Estaré encantada de leeros.

Header image source: Pixabay

How to set a budget for your freelance business

This post was originally published on the Thoughts On Translation blog. It is reposted with permission from the author.

Setting a budget for your freelance business is important, because:

-Many freelancers have no idea how much they need to earn in order to achieve the same level of financial security as someone with a traditional job.
-As a freelancer, you probably need to earn more than you think in order to reach your financial goals.
-You need to know how many billable hours per week you need in order to reach your target income.
-If your rates right now are too low, you need to at least acknowledge that and make a plan to do better in the future (rather than working, working, and working, and then wondering why your bank account empties so fast).

In my online courses, I use a worksheet called “deciding what to charge.” John Milan and I also used this worksheet in our session at the 2018 ATA conference (which got very positive reviews, so hopefully we’ll present it again!). Here, I’ll give you a simplified version of how to do the calculations on that sheet.

Start with: the amount of money you want in your bank account every month, to pay your non-business living expenses such as rent or mortgage, utilities, food, entertainment, and so on. That’s your desired/required net monthly salary.

Next: to that, add every expense that you incur for your business. If the expense is not paid monthly (i.e. professional association dues), divide it into a monthly amount and enter that. Your expenses may include some or all of the following, plus anything else that you pay that is not listed here:

-Taxes: (20-50%, depending on your tax bracket and your country)
-Retirement account contribution
-Paid vacation/sick time allocation (money that you put into a business savings account so that you can pay yourself when you take time off)
-Professional association dues
-Professional development (conferences, webinars, classes, individual coaching, etc.)
-Subscription-based web services (cloud backups, PDF conversion service, LinkedIn Premium, etc.)
-Office rent
-Computer hardware and software (new purchases and/or upgrades)
-Work-related child care (if applicable; and don’t forget in that in the US, you may be able to deduct summer day camp for kids under 13)
-Work-related travel
-Communications (internet, cell phone, Skype minutes, etc.)

Add it all up, and that’s your required or desired monthly gross income. Warning: as discussed above, this will be a big number. Perhaps bigger than you want to admit; but the first step is to get a grand total. If you’re feeling energetic, do this for three income levels: the minimum you can live off, the amount that gives you the similar level of financial security to someone with a traditional job, and something in between.

Next (not done yet!), multiply that number/those numbers by 12, to get your required or desired yearly gross income. Write that down.

Now we’ll convert that to your required hourly rate.

Take 52 weeks, and subtract the number of weeks you think you will not work (vacation, sick time, time off to take care of family members, etc). Divide your yearly gross income as calculated above, by your number of working weeks. That gives you your required income per week. For example if your required/desired gross income is $90,000 and you’re going to work 48 weeks per year, your required income per week is $1,875 per week.

Next, determine how many hours per week you realistically think you can/want to bill. Non-billable time is a big variable. For beginners, non-billable time often involves time that you would like to be working, but you don’t have paying work. For experienced translators, it’s more likely to involve non-billable but necessary tasks such as accounting, marketing, professional development, research, client communications, etc. As a side note, when other freelancers ask me, “How do you find the time to work on marketing or other non-translation tasks?” my answer is “By not having to bill 40 hours a week.”

I’d advise doing this calculation for perhaps 25, 30, and 35 billable hours per week: take your required weekly income (your equivalent of the $1,875 listed above), and divide that by your number of billable hours, to determine your required hourly rate. For example at 25 billable hours per week, our $90,000 translator would need to earn $75 per billable hour to generate $1,875 in a week.

The fun continues because most translators aren’t paid by the hour. If you are, great: you’re done, other than asking whether your existing clients will pay your required hourly rate. If you get paid by the word or the project, then you need to further calculate how fast (or slowly) you translate. For example to generate $75 an hour, you could translate 500 words at 15 cents, or 250 words at 30 cents, or 800 words at 9.3 cents (these are not recommended rates or translation speeds, just examples). Translation speed is a huge factor in your income, and one that a lot of translators overlook: if you are someone who translates 250 words an hour, you need to charge a lot more than someone who translates 600 words an hour.

At the end of all this, you should at least have a better sense of whether the numbers for your freelance business add up the way you want them to; and if you’re not making enough money, why you’re not.

  • Perhaps you have tons of work, but it’s pervasively low-paying.
  • Perhaps your rates are fine, but you need more work.
  • Perhaps you translate very slowly.
  • Either way, these calculations should help you base your pricing decisions on objective data, rather than on fear and vague speculation about “what the market will bear.”

In closing, a huge thank you to Jonathan Hine, who presented the pricing presentation at the ATA conference for many years before passing the baton to me and John, and whose booklet “I Am Worth It!” goes into greater depth on the calculation methods I’ve mentioned here!

Image source: Pixabay

Translators vs. Translation Agencies: How Falling Rates Have Turned Once-Allies into Enemies (and What We Can Do to Fix it)

We’ve noticed something strange: though demand has risen for language services, it would appear that prices are falling. Whether due to advances in technology, economic issues, global supply, or simply more aggressive buyers, we find ourselves in an industry that’s never been more in demand and yet has never been more precarious. This understandably leaves many of us overworked, underpaid, and seriously stressed out.

So why aren’t translators and translation agencies banding together to form a united front against this downward race to the bottom? Instead of saying no to unreasonable demands or rates and seeking better clients, many of us have turned our antagonism inward and, unfortunately, at each other. How is it that translator and agency—once sworn allies—are now seemingly always butting heads?

Constant downward pressure has caused a serious rift between translators and translation agencies that did not always exist. Agencies, translators say, bring little to the table and do nothing more than take a cut of an already smaller pie. Translators, agencies assert, don’t fully understand the value in having a company bring them work, advocate for them, and pay them even if the client defaults.

However, speaking as both experienced freelance translator and now proud translation agency owner, I can say it’s not too late. Both agency and translator can work together to separate the wheat from the chaff by finding serious clients.

Growing at a compounded average growth rate of 7.76% every year, the translation industry is expected to be worth approximately US$68 billion by 2020. What’s more, due to the ever-increasing trend toward globalization, translation is often considered recession-proof. The businesses of translation, software localization, and interpreting generate revenues of US$37 billion a year—and that’s for the software-assisted segment of the market alone.

By anyone’s metrics, that’s more than enough money to go around. So how do we repair this rift and start working together again? Below, I will introduce some helpful ways both translators and agencies can remember to work together.

Translation agencies are not the enemy—translators just have to know who to choose

One step toward cooperation is realizing that translation agencies on the whole are not the enemy. For every agency employing fly-by-night tactics and offering a pittance, there is another that could serve as a worthwhile source of income.

As a translator, think of every agency you work with. Are they a serious outfit? Do they pay on time? Do they take the time to match a translation with the best translator for the job? Have any colleagues worked with them, and if so, what did those colleagues say? There are vast resources online for translators to perform due diligence before accepting work.

The main idea here is to stop accepting work from any old agency. One way to achieve that is by carrying out due diligence on every translation agency you come across. Read their website carefully; see if their copy focuses on quality over quantity. And, pro tip? If the agency doesn’t list their rates on their website, it’s probably a good sign. Excellent translation agencies know that a one-size-fits-all approach to translation is not the way to go.

It’s okay to be picky about who you work with and who you work for. At the end of the day, you bring immense value to the table, so doing what you can to protect it is just plain smart. Now you might be asking yourself what can agencies do to make translators want to work with them?

How agencies can attract excellent translators

First things first, as an agency, your job is to serve your clients’ needs. But that doesn’t mean you have to bargain hard with your language service providers, shortchange them, or overwork them.

A reputable agency should be able to strike a happy medium between happy clients and happy freelancers. It’s okay to be competitive on price, but it’s not okay to expect that your translators will work for peanuts. Setting your rates at or above the industry average is a good place to start. The better your rates, the better the translators you can work with. And for clients seeking quality, this is a winning combination.

Oh, and those translators who work for you? If you want to be a translation agency worth its salt, make sure that you take the time to call them by name in emails. If you don’t value the people doing the translations, why would they want to work with you again? And never, ever, ever mass-mail a job to every translator on your roster. Not only would your client hate this, your translators will as well.

Beyond the above, translation agencies would do well to pay on time, every time. When a client (hopefully never) defaults on payment, this is not an excuse to stiff a translator who has already handed in work.

Finally, translation agencies must take care to recognize that not every translator is suited for every job. It takes a professional translation agency to match a job with the right translator—you should never hand a finance job to a generalist or a medical job to a bilingual attorney, for example.

Putting it all together—and working together in 2019 and beyond

As translators and translation agencies, we are all part of an industry that our agency has noticed is both growing and facing downward pressure like never before. However, this does not mean that the proverbial pie is getting smaller for all of us. Instead, the best pies are now bought at the specialty shops and the artisanal bakeries. In other words, the best agencies are now concentrating on finding clients who appreciate good, quality work. They’re not interested in packaging up a million pies for wholesale distributors.

The best pies are now bought at the specialty shops and the artisanal bakeries.

Call me old-fashioned, but I think the best translations are born of organic relationships between translator and agency that are based on mutual respect and cultivated over time. Getting to know each other goes a long way—and is certainly better than a mass-mail call for the lowest rate.

So, to that end: reach out to the person behind the screen. On the one hand, translators should get to know who’s behind the agencies they work with. Conversely, agencies should make a concerted effort to know their translators: their strengths, their weaknesses, and the catalogue of services they offer. Only by communicating clearly and effectively with each other can we continue to prosper and attract better clients for all.

Image credit: Pixabay

Author bio

Prior to founding Metropolitan Translations, Audra de Falco was a freelance legal translator and interpreter for 15 years and holds a BA in Jurisprudence and an MSc in Law and Public Policy. She knows the translation industry intimately as both freelancer and translation agency representative, and believes we can all land excellent, well-paying clients.

When she’s not helping clients get the incisive (and accurate) translations they deserve, she’s working her way through the family cookbook and walking her brother’s dog (he’s the best boy!).

You can visit Metropolitan Translations at http://www.metropolitantranslations.com/ or on Twitter at @translatenyc.